Air Force Wants Novel Ideas for Building ‘Data Scientist’s Ecosystems’ at Operations Centers

Air Force Wants Novel Ideas for Building ‘Data Scientist’s Ecosystems’ at Operations Centers

The Air Force’s military superiority is centered around the service and individual airmen’s ability to ingest new information and act quickly and decisively. But the unending waves of data being collected through modern methods have made that harder, and top Air Force scientists are looking for new ways to streamline the process.


In the 1950s, Air Force Col. John Boyd [no relation to this article’s author] developed a method for systematizing the decision-making process for combat pilots: the OODA Loop, which stands for observe, orient, decide and act. According to Boyd—and decades of Air Force and military strategy since—the combatant with the shortest OODA Loop will have the advantage in any fight.


As the Air Force continues to rapidly expand the amount of data it collects, the service is focused on ingesting and processing that information in a timely fashion. To that end, officials at the Air Force Research Lab Information Directorate are looking to create an Air Operations Center “Data Scientist’s Ecosystem” that can take in unstructured data and clean it up for use by Air Force data scientists and automated tools.


“The Air Force is interested in novel methods to develop a work bench, work flow, or ecosystem that enables rapid integration of new data for use in operations centers and brings it to bear on mission directives to improve the efficiency and accuracy of operations,” according to a request for information posted Monday to beta.SAM.gov.


“Often the processing necessary to make data available in operations centers takes so long that the operational relevance of the data expires,” defying the ..