NIST Awards Nearly $4 Million to Support Metals-Based Additive Manufacturing

NIST Awards Nearly $4 Million to Support Metals-Based Additive Manufacturing

Credit: © Earl Zubkoff




With funding from the NIST Metals-Based Additive Manufacturing Grants Program, Georgia Tech Research Corp., the University of Texas at El Paso, Purdue University and Northeastern University will help advance metals-based additive manufacturing by leveraging NIST's expertise in the area. NIST mechanical engineer Brandon Lane studies this layer-by-layer printing process in depth to help manufacturers improve their “recipes” for quality parts and assemblies at NIST's Additive Manufacturing Metrology Testbed.

GAITHERSBURG, Md. — The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology has awarded nearly $4 million in grants to help accelerate the adoption of new measurement methods and standards to advance U.S. competitiveness in metals-based additive manufacturing (AM). 


“NIST and the entire Department of Commerce are committed to providing American organizations the necessary resources to thrive and build upon their discoveries and innovations,” said U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “I congratulate these grant awardees, whose contributions to metals-based additive manufacturing will certainly help America play a bigger role in the industry.”


“By addressing important measurement challenges, these projects will improve U.S. manufacturers’ ability to use metals-based additive manufacturing to make high-quality, innovative and complex products at high volume,” said Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology and NIST Director Walter G. Copan. “We look forward to working with these organizations to further leverage NIST experience and expertise in this key area of advanced manufacturing.”


Additive manufacturing typically creates parts and components by building them layer by layer, based on a 3D computer model that is virtually sliced into many thin layers. Metals-based additive processes form parts by melting or sintering material in powder form. The process offers advantages such as reduced material waste, lower energy intensity, reduced time to market and just-in-time production.


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