Microsoft's Dream of Decentralized IDs Enters the Real World

Microsoft's Dream of Decentralized IDs Enters the Real World

For years, tech companies have touted blockchain technology as a means to develop identity systems that are secure and decentralized. The goal is to build a platform that could store information about official data without holding the actual documents or details themselves. Instead of just storing a scan of your birth certificate, for example, a decentralized ID platform might store a validated token that confirms the information in it. Then when you get carded at a bar or need proof of citizenship, you could share those pre-verified credentials instead of the actual document or data. Microsoft has been one of the leaders of this pack—and is now detailing tangible progress toward its vision of a decentralized digital ID. 


At its Ignite conference today, Microsoft announced that it will launch a public preview of its “Azure Active Directory verifiable credentials” this spring. Think of the platform as a digital wallet like Apple Pay or Google Pay, but for identifiers rather than credit cards. Microsoft is starting with things like university transcripts, diplomas, and professional credentials, letting you add them to its Microsoft Authenticator app along with two-factor codes. It's already testing the platform at Keio University in Tokyo, with the government of Flanders in Belgium, and with the United Kingdom's National Health Service.


"If you have a decentralized identifier I can verify, say, where you went to school, and I don’t need you to send me all of the information," says Joy Chik, corporate vice president for Microsoft's cloud and enterprise identity division. “All I need is to get that digital credential and because it’s already been verified I can trust it." 

Microsoft will release a ..