Intel wheels out new face authentication product that works a lot like Apple's FaceID

Intel wheels out new face authentication product that works a lot like Apple's FaceID

Intel has gingerly dipped a toe into the face-based authentication market with the launch of its RealSense ID product.


Aimed primarily at corporate customers and those dabbling in embedded systems, RealSense ID will allow individuals to prove their identity based purely on their facial features. The inaugural hardware is available in two variants: a module which can be embedded into larger projects, and a complete peripheral unit that's ready to use out of the box.

In terms of security, Chipzilla has made some bold claims, stating RealSense ID has a one-in-one-million false acceptance rate and can withstand the usual attempts to circumvent face-based authentication tools, like masks and photographs, with – according to its RealSense webpage – a spoof acceptance rate of less than 0.1 per cent. However, Intel's own datasheet [PDF] for the product puts the acceptance rate at less than 1 per cent. We've asked Intel for clarification.


Face ID has been slated for its lack of compatibility with face masks in the wake of the COVID pandemic.


In terms of implementation, RealSense is similar to the approach taken by Apple with FaceID, which sees the heavy computational legwork performed on-device with dedicated hardware. A dedicated SoC running an unspecified closed real-time operating system (RTOS) runs a proprietary Intel-made neural network, while user data is stored in a secure element not too dissimilar to the Secure Enclave found on most modern iOS and Mac devices.


In terms of optics, the kit uses two semi-aligned camer ..