Here's a Quick Look at How Pakistani Counterfeiters Helped Russian Operatives

Here's a Quick Look at How Pakistani Counterfeiters Helped Russian Operatives

One company stood out in a cascade of U.S. sanctions imposed on Thursday on Russian cybersecurity companies and officials allegedly acting on behalf of the Kremlin intelligence in Karachi, Pakistan: ‘A fresh air farm house’. 

The Farm House, whose Facebook page reveals a waterpark-equipped vacation rental, is run by 34-year-old Mohsin Raza, considered one of two founders of an internet faux ID enterprise that prosecutors say helped Russian operatives get a toehold in the United States. 

According to a U.S. Treasury assertion and an indictment issued this week by federal prosecutors in New Jersey, Raza operated a digital faux ID mill, churning out photographs of doctored drivers’ licenses, bogus passports, and cast utility payments to assist rogue shoppers to go verification checks at U.S. fee firms and tech corporations. 

Reuters reached Raza in Pakistan at a telephone number offered by the US Treasury's sanctions record. He confirmed his identity and acknowledged being a digital counterfeiter, saying he used "simple Photoshop" to change ID cards, bills, and other documents to order. Raza – who stated he is additionally dabbled in graphic design, e-commerce and cryptocurrency – denied any wrongdoing, saying he was merely serving to individuals entry accounts that they’d been frozen out of.

Among his clients, the New Jersey indictment alleges was a worker of the Internet Research Agency – a notorious Russian troll farm implicated by U.S. investigators, media experiences, leaked paperwork, and former insiders in efforts to intrude in U.S. elections. The IRA worker used Raza’s companies in 2017 to obtain cast drivers’ licenses to assist the identification of pretend accounts on Facebook, based on the indictme ..