HaXmas Hardware Hacking

HaXmas Hardware Hacking

Usually, when you read an IoT hacking report or blog post, it ends with something along the lines of, "and that's how I got root," or "and there was a secret backdoor credential," or "and every device in the field uses the same S3 bucket with no authentication." You know, something bad, and the whole reason for publishing the research in the first place. While such research is of course interesting, important, and worth publishing, we pretty much never hear about the other outcome: the IoT hacking projects that didn't uncover something awful, but instead ended up with, "and everything looked pretty much okay."


So, this HaXmas, I decided to dig around a little in Rapid7's library of IoT investigations that never really went anywhere, just to see which tools were used. The rest of this blog post is basically a book report of the tooling used in a recent engagement performed by our own Jonathan Stines, and can be used as a starting point if you're interested in getting into some casual IoT hacking yourself. Even though this particular engagement didn't go anywhere, I had a really good time reading along with Stines' investigation on a smart doorbell camera.


Burp Suite


While Burp Suite might be a familiar mainstay for web app hackers, it has a pretty critical role in IoT investigations as well. The "I" in IoT is what makes these Things interesting, so checking out what and how those gadgets are chatting on the internet is pretty critical in figuring out the security posture of those devices. Burp Suite lets investigators capture, inspect, and replay conversations in a proxied context, ..