Business top brass are terrified their companies will simply be collateral damage in a future cyber-war

Business top brass are terrified their companies will simply be collateral damage in a future cyber-war

Businesses are worrying about being caught in the crossfire of cyber warfare, according to research from Bitdefender – while industry figures warn that the gap between common-or-garden cyber threats and “oh, look what nation states are doing” is becoming ever smaller.


Bitdefender’s latest research report, titled 10 in 10, surveyed around 6,000 C-suite bods responsible for cyber security and found [PDF] that “over a fifth” of these said that cyber warfare was one of the most challenging topics they had to convince their colleagues to take seriously.


The firm’s Liviu Arsene told The Register: “I don’t think they’re afraid of cyber warfare in the sense of directly being targeted, more in line with being collateral victims of cyberwarfare taking out electric power grids, internet. They need to be prepared for these kind of attacks.”


Good thing there are people like, say, Bitdefender on hand to help, eh?


Cyber warfare, at its simplest, involves disrupting computers to achieve a real-world effect. This could be something like a denial-of-service (DoS) attack against a power grid*, intended to cause a power outage, or the infamous Stuxnet malware infection that set back Iran’s nuclear weapon ambitions by several years. It could also include attacks designed to degrade an adversary’s own ability to mount cyber attacks; cyber on cyber.


Not every aspect of such warfare overspilling onto civilian organisations is necessarily as worrying as it might be for nation states. Arsene said: “I remember last year an interesting consequence of cyber warfare was when it became physical. The Israeli government was facing a cyber attack, track ..